Judging you by your favourite cover

Much like what your favourite colour says about you, or your favourite food, or your favourite toothpaste, the internet provides the answer to the question: “What does your favourite book says about you?” From insightful to silly, a simple search will provide many links, like this one or this one. What seems interesting is that while taking the colour test yields mostly positive results (if you like red, you are passionate; if you like blue, you are calm, and so on), bibliopsychology (here’s a new term for posterity) is very judgemental. Your favourite book may say about you that you are a geek, or a pervert obsessed with young girls, or a manic depressive who thinks he is followed at every step — you get points if you guess which books are hinted at here.

Who would say this is their favourite book?

Who would say this is their favourite book?

Seriously now, it may be hard to escape the connotations associated with most books — such as if you claim that your favourite book is Ulysses, everybody will think you are a pretentious phoney, because nobody seems to have ever finished it. It is also true that we are aware of the fact that asking about a favourite book is not as innocent as a favourite food question. You know you will be judged, and it will be hard not to be found guilty. Even various genres have their own implied associations. Think of romances, fantasy stories, graphic novels, or self-help books and see what character traits come to mind. I did, and I decided against mentioning them here for fear that I may awake the wrath of many. My own stark assessments also surprised me greatly, considering that I am known to have enjoyed such books on occasion. But the truth is that loving a book, or more, or all, is better than replying “I don’t read much… these days.” It’s better to have read and loved, than not to have read at all.